Home New Posts DEFEND & REFORM: The Future of America’s Defense Spending Live Discussion Panel

DEFEND & REFORM: The Future of America’s Defense Spending Live Discussion Panel

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With a looming “fiscal cliff” that includes across-the-board spending cuts hovering above Washington, the future of American defense spending is uncertain. What is nearly certain is that the Department of Defense will see additional budget cuts. The pertinent questions are therefore: how much cutting is too much? how much is enough? and how do we cut smartly in order to preserve America’s military might?

Concerned Veterans for America (CVA) believes Congress should undertake serious reforms to defense spending to maintain a sustainable fiscal path that preserves American power. To that end, over the past five months, CVA has produced five “case studies” that examine various examples of defense cuts and reforms, with an eye towards identifying what makes for smart, strategic, and effective defense reforms.  The “lessons learned” from each case study will be aggregated into a single document that provides the beginnings of an accessible blueprint for practical defense reform.

As a capstone event , The Weekly Standard’s William Kristol will moderate a panel discussion on December 11th on defense spending, featuring experts in the field—including Michael O’Hanlon of the Brookings Institution, who will provide the keynote address. Sponsored by Concerned Veterans for America, the DEFEND & REFORM: The Future of America’s Defense Spending” event will diagnose defense spending challenges and offer practical solutions.

Speakers will include: United States Senator Lindsey Graham, United States Congressman Tim Griffien, Steve Bucci (The Heritage Foundation) Michael O’Hanlon (Brookings Institution), Pete Hegseth (Concerned Veterans for America), Russell Rumbaugh (Stimson Center) and more.

You are able to tune in to a LIVE stream of our capstone event from 12:00pm – 2:00pm ET. No log in necessary, to connect CLICK HERE.

Concerned Veterans for America [CVA] believes Congress should undertake serious reforms to defense spending to maintain a sustainable fiscal path that preserves American power. To that end, over the past five months, CVA has produced five “case studies” that examine various examples of defense cuts and reforms, with an eye towards identifying what makes for smart, strategic, and effective defense reforms

CASE STUDY #5 | A ‘Missing Defense System’: MEADS Needs to Go

Concerned Veterans for America (CVA) believes Congress should undertake serious reforms to defense spending to maintain a sustainable fiscal path that preserves American power. To that end, over the past five months, CVA has produced five “case studies” that examine various examples of defense cuts and reforms, with an eye towards identifying what makes for smart, strategic, and effective defense reforms.

In our fifth and final installment of the “Defend and Reform” series, we turn our focus to the Medium Extended Air Defense System (MEADS), perhaps one of the most controversial systems in an era of increased fiscal responsibility, and a telling example of dysfunction in Congressional priority-setting and executive branch procurement. The development of this missile system is a textbook example of political turf battles that result in legislator fighting for earmarks without regard for strategic needs.

CASE STUDY #4 | Green Fleet and Grocery Stores: Reducing “Fat” to preserve “Muscle”

Previous Concerned Veterans for America case studies have centered on sensible reductions in defense spending  (Closure of U.S. Joint Forces Command), reforming administrative practices (Auditing the Pentagon), and reforming weapons procurement (Fielding Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicles). Indifferent ways, the first three case studies highlighted examples in which the Pentagon could, and did, do things well. This report is different, focusing on places in the Department of Defense (DoD) budget where a change in spending priorities, large or small, is needed.

In order to save critical and cutting-edge defense programs and capabilities (the “muscle”), DoD must be willing to part ways with certain practices (the “fat”) that are excessive, outdated, or unnecessary.  This case study will focus on the Department of the Navy’s alternative fuel source push (the so-called “Green Fleet”), as well as other elements of the defense budget that either need reform or should be eliminated altogether—without undercutting our nation’s strategic capabilities.

CASE STUDY #3 | A Moral Imperative: Fielding Mine-Resistant Vehicles

“A Moral Imperative: Fielding Mine-Resistant Vehicles” is the latest installment in the ‘Defend & Reform’ Case Study series and you can read it here. In this study we look at the traditional defense acquisition process and why it was bypassed in order to get live-saving vehicles to the battlefield in Iraq and Afghanistan. Mine resistant vehicles were urgently needed, but the conventional Pentagon bureaucracy couldn’t deliver. Why? How was is bypassed? And is this case study a lesson in how to reform the defense acquisition process?

The ‘Defend & Reform’ Case Study Series includes five case studies and will culminate in a “lessons learned” event in December that will examine various defense reforms and cuts, in order to identify what makes for smart, strategic, and effective defense reforms.

CASE STUDY #2 | Hiding in Plain Sight: Time for a Pentagon Audit

Today, Concerned Veterans for America (CVA) released its second case study in a series launched last month entitled ‘Defend & Reform’. This study is called “Hiding in Plain Sight: Time for a Pentagon Audit.” Did you know that the Department of Defense has never performed an independent audit of its finances? With the national debt now surpassing more than $16 trillion and annual budget deficits exceeding $1 trillion, now is the time. We should seize this moment—with the nation on the edge of a fiscal cliff—to bring greater discipline, transparency and accountability to reforming the defense budget. This study highlights the need for a long overdue audit to the financial operations of the Pentagon.

It’s time for reform. Review our second case study in our Defend & Reform series titled “Hiding in Plain Sight: Time for a Pentagon Audit” and you can read the full case study by clicking below…

 

CASE STUDY #1 | One Year Later: The Closing of Joint Forces Command

Review Part One of a Concerned Veterans for America project, the Defend & Reform Case Study Series. The series—which will include five case studies and culminate in a “lessons learned” event in December—examines various past defense reforms and cuts, in order to identify what makes for smart, strategic, and effective defense reforms.

Our first in the series is titled “One Year Later: The Closing of Joint Forces Command” and you can read the full case study by clicking below…